Basing a Term of Supervised Release on the Need for Retribution Is Plain Error

Burden and a co-defendant were both convicted after a jury trial of, among other things, racketeering, violent crimes in aid of racketeering, and a cocaine conspiracy. Both were sentenced to life imprisonment. After exhausting their direct appeals, both brought habeas petitions to vacate their convictions pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 2255. Each then entered into a “Stipulation for Resentencing” with the government where they agreed to withdraw the habeas petitions in exchange for being resentenced based on a Guidelines range of 262-365 months’ imprisonment. The district court the resentenced each to 365 months’ imprisonment and a life term of supervised release.

The defendants appealed and argued that the district court first erred by not advising them that they faced terms of supervised release and then also failed to adequately explain the decision to impose life terms of supervised release. In response, the government claimed that the appeals were barred by an appellate waiver provision in the resentencing stipulations. The relevant language stated that if the district court imposed “an incarceration term within the agreed-upon guideline range of 262-365 months’ incarceration,” the defendants waived the right to appeal or collaterally attack any claimed error in connection with the resentencing.

In United States v. Burden, (2d Cir. June 19, 2017), the Circuit found that the waivers were valid and the district court’s failure to advise the defendants regarding supervised release was not plain error. However, the Circuit also concluded that the language of the waivers did not encompass the imposition of supervised release, and the district court committed plain error by apparently relying on retribution as a basis for imposing the life term. As such, the Circuit vacated and remanded for resentencing as to the terms of supervised release.